Unseen House Mill

House Mill, Three Mill Lane

A series of shorts films will take you to hidden parts of the House Mill, a Grade I-listed, eighteenth-century mill and the largest surviving tidal mill in the world. Filmed during lockdown by House Mill volunteers the films explore magnificent panoramic views from the roof, the unique pattern store and the story of how the mill was saved from demolition.


Beverley Charters, House Mill Trustee, gives us a tour of the pattern store with a unique collection of over 2,660 original wooden patterns. They are key for future restoration where the House Mill hopes that these original patterns can be used to cast new parts to get the mill machinery working again.


John Haggerty speaks to us about when he first discovered the House Mill with holes in its roof and how this important site was saved from demolition. He shares with us a collection of photographs from the restoration. Many people including John played a major part in saving the mill including: Ian Robertson, Pat Wilkinson and Jim Cheldersley.


Claire Corley, Volunteer takes us to the roof of the House Mill to see its spectacular panoramic views, where you can see all of London and watch the ongoing development of Newham from this historic site. You will also view the House Mill from the river Lea and see how the tidal water runs under the building. Subject to permissions in the future the House Mill want to sensitively install photo-voltaic Solar panels as part of their green energy future plans. 


House Mill Trust is committed to restoring House Mill to full working order.  Mills have been located at this site since records in the Domesday Book report 8 mills, grinding grain for flour, to feed the people of the City of London.  The current structure, dating from 1776, is the last remaining example of the once rich industrial heritage along the Lower Lea Valley, and has survived the Blitz, the previous owners’ plans for demolition, and the many local development schemes.

Future green energy plans

A working mill –  It is the intention of the House Mill Trust to restore all four heritage water wheels, and some of the milling machinery, for demonstration of the grinding process and the sack hoist mechanism.

Renewable Energy – The next stage of regeneration, after restoration of the heritage machinery, will be that the four wheels will be used to produce hydro-electricity. Machinery that spans four centuries, but with a contemporary use. Using the sunny House Mill valley roof, the Trust also want to fit Solar photo-voltaic panels, subject to permissions. 

These two initiatives will supply the electrical energy needs of the House Mill and prevent the emission of tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere each year and surplus electricity will be sold to provide a regular income stream for the House Mill. 

Volunteer – If you like to join the House Mill’s happy team. Visit House Mill for contact information.


About this record

A series of three short films will take you to hidden parts of the House Mill, a Grade I-listed, eighteenth-century mill and the largest surviving tidal mill in the world. Filmed during lockdown by House Mill volunteers the films explore the magnificent panoramic from the roof of the mill, the pattern store with over 2,660 wooden patterns in their collection and the story of how the mill was saved from demolition.

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